Dedicated team care

Macmillan Cancer Support team - feature about their work in support of the world's biggest coffee morning'Jane Dacre, Lynette Humphrey, Janet Roses, Debbie Tams, Joy Waldock, Angela Cresswell, Sharon Firth, Julie Wood.
Macmillan Cancer Support team - feature about their work in support of the world's biggest coffee morning'Jane Dacre, Lynette Humphrey, Janet Roses, Debbie Tams, Joy Waldock, Angela Cresswell, Sharon Firth, Julie Wood.

GROUPS and offices around the district will be getting the kettle on at the end of the month to raise money for Macmillan Cancer Support as part of its world’s biggest coffee morning.

But behind the baking and brewing up a cuppa, lies a dedicated team of staff providing vital care for patients both in hospitals and in the community, right across the district.

Jeanette Barnes, Macmillan specialist palliative care sister, who is based at the Mid Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust, said: “We cover all three general hospitals and we also have teams attached to GP-allocated areas who work from various centres and see people at home. We support generalist nurses and GPs in the community, and nurses and doctors on wards, looking after their patients.

“We’re here for anyone with a terminal, progressive disease who is approaching the end of life. Our job is to help with symptom management, end of life care, emotional support for both patients, carers and families and we can follow that with bereavement care and we are a link to the local hospices.

“We specifically aim to try to be an advocate for the patient, so we can help them with their preferred priorities of care, where they want to be, and work with their GPs to facilitate that.”

Palliative, or end of life, care focuses specifically on the wants and needs of a patient when an illness can no longer be cured.

Jeanette said: “We start by doing a holistic assessment of the patient’s healthcare needs and social needs, and all areas around their emotional needs.

“It’s important we identify the wants and needs of a patient of how they want their care to be managed, so if they come to a phase where they can’t manage it themselves we can still work with their wishes.”

A big part of the work of Macmillan nurses is helping patients and their families come to terms with a terminal diagnosis.

Jeanette said: “We have to make sure they understand what their healthcare professionals have said and then how they interpret it, and communication between family members so we are all coming from the same place.

“It can be emotional. There are certain instances that can get you, but it’s rewarding when you know you are helping people and their families through difficult times.”

The Wakefield district Macmillan team has organised its own coffee morning, in the main atrium of Pinderfields Hospital on Friday September 28 to support the world’s biggest coffee morning, from 9am to 11.30am, with staff giving up their own time to help raise funds.

As well as refreshments and cakes, there will be a raffle at noon, with prizes including meal vouchers and bed and breakfast vouchers, all of which the team hopes will push their fundraising on the day to £2,000.

Anyone who would like to offer a raffle prize can contact Jeanette on 01924 543801. Email coffee@macmillan.org.uk to find out how to organise your own coffee morning.

l The Pontefract and Castleford Express is holding a coffee morning to support Macmillan’s world’s biggest coffee morning, on Friday September 28 from 10am to noon, with refreshments and homemade cakes, and is asking readers to come along.

Contact Trish Ellis at trish.ellis@pandcexpress.co.uk or call 01977 781935 to find out more or lend your support.