Help tot Amy to get her treatment

Newspaper: Wakefield Express.'Story: Sedgwick family from Overton. Hoping to raise �1,950 for treatment for 16 month old daughter, Amy, who has plagiocephaly - 'flat head syndrome'. The family have been told by the NHS that they will not fund the treatment, as it is deemed cosmetic.'photo date: 05/11/15'Picture Ref: AB516a1115

Newspaper: Wakefield Express.'Story: Sedgwick family from Overton. Hoping to raise �1,950 for treatment for 16 month old daughter, Amy, who has plagiocephaly - 'flat head syndrome'. The family have been told by the NHS that they will not fund the treatment, as it is deemed cosmetic.'photo date: 05/11/15'Picture Ref: AB516a1115

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The family of a 16-month-old toddler are trying to raise £1,950 after being told the treatment she needs is not available on the NHS.

Mum Tracey Sedgwick was told she would have to find the money to pay for a specialist helmet after her daughter Amy was born with plagiocephaly.

The condition - known as flat head syndrome - is caused when part of a baby’s head becomes flattened due to continued pressure on one spot.

The special helmet encourages the bones to mould into a more rounded shape.

The condition can also affect the jaw, ear alignment and is also linked to reflux.

Mrs Sedgwick, 36, of Overton, said: “Being told that your child needs a certain kind of treatment is heartbreaking and then to be told that it’s going to cost all this money is really hard to take.

“Amy was a premature baby and only weighed 2lb 11oz at birth. She is still pretty small for her age now. She is 16-months-old now but is only the size of nine-months-old.”

The condition means the right-hand side of Amy’s face is slightly off-set but Mrs Sedgwick and her husband Jonathan - who have five other children - were told the treatment was not available on the NHS because it is cosmetic.

The tot now has to wear the helmet for 23 hours a day for the next nine months.

Her family have organised a wrestling event later this month to raise funds for Amy’s treatment.

It will take place at UK Wrestling Training Centre at Alexandra Mills in Batley on Saturday, November 21.

According to the NHS website, there are two specific types of flat head syndrome - plagiocephaly, which is the most common, and brachycephaly.

In some minor cases, solving the problem can involve simply ensuring that the baby spends time on their tummy during the day, or by changing the position of toys and objects in their cot so that their head naturally turns to the non-flattened side.

Helmet therapy is used in more serious instances and involves the baby wearing a specially formed hat continuously for between three and six months. The shape of the head is then checked every six weeks to ensure that it is growing as expected. This is however, not available on the NHS.

For more information or to donate to the appeal visit the family’s fundraising website at https://www.gofundme.com/fa7786e4