Horror as baby given wrong jab

Baby Lily Fletcher, 12 months, was given the wrong injection at her doctors' surgery in Allerton Bywater.Lily with her parents Gemma and John.
Baby Lily Fletcher, 12 months, was given the wrong injection at her doctors' surgery in Allerton Bywater.Lily with her parents Gemma and John.
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HORRIFIED parents Gemma and John Fletcher are calling for action after their one-year-old daughter was given the wrong injection at an Allerton Bywater doctors’ surgery.

The couple, of the village, claim their only child Lily was given the pre-school booster – meant for children aged three or four – instead of her routine 12-month jabs at the Nova Scotia GP practice on Leeds Road last Thursday.

A spokesman from NHS Leeds said it had sought advice from the Health Protection Agency and could reassure the parents the vaccine was “safe”.

However, mum Gemma, 26, of Siskin Way, said: “These people are supposed to be professionals. I can’t believe what they’ve done to our precious daughter.”

John, who is serving in the army, took Lily to the surgery for routine vaccinations given to children at 12 months old.

Gemma said: “After they came back from the surgery everything was fine when my phone started ringing. As soon as I saw it was the doctors’ my heart sank.

“I picked up the phone and was told ‘I don’t want to panic you, but your daughter was given the wrong injection’.

“They explained Lily had been given the pre-school boost and it would not harm her, but I couldn’t believe it. The outcome could have been fatal if they had vaccinated my precious baby with something else.”

The couple have made a formal complaint to the surgery and are calling for action to be taken.

The pre-school booster is given to children around the age of three years and four months and is a vaccination against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis and polio.

Gemma said: “I don’t want other parents to have to go what we’ve been through. I want to know how and why this happened. Why weren’t the vaccinations checked?

“I don’t understand how she was given the pre-school booster when it’s obvious she’s not a pre-school child – her date of birth would be on her records.

“I want to know what procedures will be in place to make sure this never happens again.”

A spokesman for NHS Leeds, on behalf of the surgery, said: “We take the safety of all our patients seriously and have already started an investigation into the incident. We are working closely with the GP practice to identify any training and support needs they may have.

“We have sought advice from the Health Protection Agency and can reassure the parents of the child involved that the vaccine that has been given is safe.”