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Corrupt detective who sold drugs he stole from West Yorkshire Police ordered to repay cash

West Yorkshire Police supplied picture of Nick McFadden.

West Yorkshire Police supplied picture of Nick McFadden.

A corrupt detective who stole more than £1m worth of drugs from a police compound has been ordered to pay back his ill-gotten gains or face more time in prison.

Nicholas McFadden, 39, was jailed for 23 years in April 2013 after being found guilty of theft, money laundering and conspiracy to supply drugs.

He stole heroin, cocaine and cannabis from evidence stores and then sold them on the streets with help from his brother Simon McFadden.

Nicholas McFadden, formerly of Castleford, was ordered to pay back more then £257,000 at a confiscation hearing at Leeds Crown Court on Friday, March 21.

His wife, Karen McFadden, was ordered to pay back more than £28,000 and his brother was ordered to pay back almost £41,520.

Assistant Chief Con Mark Milsom, of West Yorkshire Police, said: “Nicholas McFadden was a corrupt officer whose criminal acts were a disgrace to the good name of the dedicated officers and PCSOs who loyally serve our communities.

“Although he received a lengthy prison sentence we did not feel justice could be done unless we relentlessly pursued the monies he and his family made from their crimes.

“Obtaining these confiscation orders ensures that McFadden’s “profits of crime” will now be put to a far more profitable use within our neighbourhoods and in keeping them safe.

“West Yorkshire Police remains actively committed to tackle the actions of officers whose behaviour falls far short of the high standards the public has the right to demand.”

McFadden has six months to repay the money or face a further three years imprisonment.

The West Yorkshire Police and Crime Commissioner, Mark Burns Williamson, said: “This firmly demonstrates that, even after conviction, our investigations continue and where an individual has clearly benefited from their crime, we will seek to ensure these ill gotten gains are confiscated through the courts.

“We hope this sends a clear message to criminals that we will pursue them and they will lose not just their liberty, but also assets obtained through crime.”

 
 
 

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