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Queen’s honours for district’s unsung heroes

Allan Yellup, headteacher of Wakefield City High School.

Allan Yellup, headteacher of Wakefield City High School.

 

The Queen has rewarded the efforts of five people from our area for their services to community in her Birthday Honours list.

The chief executive of the South West Yorkshire Partnership NHS Foundation Trust, Steven Peter Michael, has been awarded an OBE for his services to healthcare.

And Alan George Yellup, executive headteacher at Wakefield City Academy and chief executive officer at Wakefield City Academies Trust has also been given an OBE for his services to education, having supported 400 schools across the nation to raise standards in challenging circumstances.

Mr Yellup said: “I feel very honoured and surprised to have received an OBE. It is an honour for both me, the school and the wonderful team at the Academy.

“The Wakefield City Academies Trust has sponsored 13 schools and helped to improve the life chances and opportunities for young people.

“I am sitting at the pinnacle of wonderful people and I think of this as an award for the school and for the community.”

Carol Ann Moran, councillor at Normanton Town Council was awarded a British Empire Medal for her services to the community.

Marjory Young, a school governor at Kirk Smeaton Primary School, Pontefract, received the same award, for her contribution to education.

Mrs Young, said: “I feel genuinely overwhelmed to be presented with the award. As a governor I’ve helped the school with ICT and fundraising for new furniture. I’ve been a governor for a number of years but I never expected this - I’m in shock.”

Diabetes campaigner, Jenny Hirst, from Horbury, was recognised with an MBE.
She successfully fought a ten-year battle against the pharmaceutical industry, on behalf of patients.

She is the co-chairwoman and co-founder of the charity Independent Diabetes Trust.

Mrs Hirst campaigned for the continuation of animal insulin after there were moves to switch diabetics onto genetically engineered insulin, which caused adverse reactions to thousands of people with the condition.

She said: “Words can hardly describe how honoured I am to be recognised in this way. I never thought that an ordinary person like me, who has just been helping people with diabetes, would be recognised like this.”

 

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