Museum home for rare torque

Andy Green and Shaun Scott from Castleford. Discovered some extremely rare gold artifacts dating to at least the Roman period, and said to be worth at least �1 million when they go to auction later this year.'p5654b127
Andy Green and Shaun Scott from Castleford. Discovered some extremely rare gold artifacts dating to at least the Roman period, and said to be worth at least �1 million when they go to auction later this year.'p5654b127
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A CASTLEFORD duo who unearthed a hoard of 2,000-year-old treasure have sold one of the rare artefacts for £25,000.

Asda warehouse workers Andy Green and Shaun Scott sold the solid gold torque (bracelet) – uncovered on a private site in North Yorkshire in 2010 – to the Yorkshire Museum.

Mr Green said: “I think it’s absolutely fantastic that the torque will stay in Yorkshire where it was found.

“It is the first piece of Iron Age jewellery ever to be found in the north and we are very proud it will be displayed in the Yorkshire Museum.

“If the museum had not bought the torque, it could have ended up on the open market and you just don’t know how much you could get for something of this quality, but we wanted it to be kept for researchers to study and local people to admire.”

The museum appealed to the public and small businesses to raise the cash to ensure it would stay in Yorkshire.

A total of £12,500 was donated by the Patricia and Donald Shepherd Charitable Trust, £1,000 from the Yorkshire Philosophical Society and another grant of more than £6,000 was given anonymously.

Natalie McCaul, assistant curator of archaeology at the museum, said: “We have been overwhelmed by the support shown by the public and local trusts following the appeal and we would like to thank everyone who has donated.

“Because of their generosity the first Iron Age gold jewellery found in the north will stay permanently in the north for people to enjoy.”

Mr Scott and Mr Green discovered two small torques – along with two Celtic gold staters (coins), a gold pin and a Viking ring – in the bed of a stream during a three-year dig.

The museum is currently raising funds to buy the second larger torque – estimated to be worth around £35,000 – before it goes to an inquest to decide its worth later this year.

The first torque is on show at the Yorkshire Museum.