Paul’s charity mission after triple cancer fight

Paul Moore (left) has suffered with cancer three times over the last 30 years. Pictured with his brother, Darren, who is organising a big charity night at The Eagle pub, Methley Rd, Castleford, in aid of Macmillan Nurses. The bike is one of the raffle prizes on the night.'p8208a212
Paul Moore (left) has suffered with cancer three times over the last 30 years. Pictured with his brother, Darren, who is organising a big charity night at The Eagle pub, Methley Rd, Castleford, in aid of Macmillan Nurses. The bike is one of the raffle prizes on the night.'p8208a212

A MAN who has battled three types of cancer over 30 years is organising a special event to raise money for charities which have supported him during his treatment.

Paul Moore, 50, of Castleford, is about to finish a course of radiotherapy to tackle head and neck cancer after previously fighting testicular and stomach cancer in his teens and 20s.

He has been left with speech difficulties after treatment to reconstruct his jaw and has organised a fundraising night at his brother’s pub to raise money for Macmillan Cancer Care.

On Saturday, March 31, Mr Moore and his family have organised a race night, auction and raffle from 7pm at The Eagle on Methley Road, Castleford.

The evening will raise cash for Macmillan and the Face The Future trust fund.

His brother Darren, 46, landlord of the pub, said: “This is for a really good cause for a local man who has been through so much.

“Paul has kept battling on and the help he has got has been fantastic.

“This is a chance for us to give something back and support them.”

As well as raising cash, Paul hopes to raise awareness of head and neck cancer.

He used to smoke 100 cigarettes and drink 12 cans of lager a day – raising his chance of getting the disease by 30 per cent – and waited to get treatment for “some time” after first spotting an abscess in his mouth.

Julie Hoole, lead Macmillan head and neck specialist, who has supported Paul, said: “Head and neck cancer is very curable but the later the diagnosis the greater impact it will have on a patient’s quality of life.

“Paul had an abscess for some time before he got it looked at. We’d say to people that if they’ve had an abscess for more than three weeks, they should get it checked by a GP or a dentist. That’s not to say that it’s cancer, but they should get it looked at.

“Head and neck cancer isn’t painful – people associate cancer with pain. There’s no screening process to pick it up so it’s important people pay attention to any warning signs.”

Anyone who would like to support the event – by donating cash or giving prizes – can contact Darren at the pub on 01977 554171.