Secret files on strike raise new questions

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The government has been urged to reconsider a controversial decision not to hold an inquiry into police tactics during the 1984-5 miners’ strike.

The government has been urged to reconsider a controversial decision not to hold an inquiry into police tactics during the 1984-5 miners’ strike.

Wakefield Council has called for an investigation of police behaviour at the infamous Battle of Orgreave to go ahead after Home Secretary Amber Rudd refused an inquiry.

The government has also admitted that secret files on the strike, including the picket at Orgreave in June 1984, are still being held - leading to fears that the full story of police tactics is being kept secret.

The existence of the files was revealed after questions from Normanton MP Yvette Cooper.

She said: “I want to know what files they’ve got, and what they know. So now I’m pressing for further information about when they will be opened up for the public.

“So far the Home Office has admitted to me that they have 30 more files on Orgreave that haven’t been released before. “Now I’m pressing for further information about when they will be opened up for the public. I also want to know what information South Yorkshire Police had still in their files and vaults too.”

The Home Office said it would transfer the files to the National Archives, where they would be publicly available, but could not give a date.

After clashes Orgreave 95 miners were prosecuted for riot and unlawful assembly, but all were acquitted when their trial collapsed amid allegations that police officers colluded to write evidence statements.

Last week Wakefield Council passed a motion calling on Amber Rudd to review the Orgreave decision. Coun Ryan Case, who bought the motion, said: “These people deserve an explanation about what happened and will feel a deep sense of injustice over the government’s announcement.”