The Ackworth Hoard goes on display in Pontefract Museum

Wakefield Council has expressed a formal interest in acquiring the 'Ackworth Hoard' discovered by an Ackworth resident last July while digging in their garden. The finder reported the discovery to the Portable Antiquities Scheme and the hoard was taken to the British Museum for assessment as potential treasure. As the hoard is more than 300 years old it is covered by the Treasure Act 1996.

Wakefield Council has expressed a formal interest in acquiring the 'Ackworth Hoard' discovered by an Ackworth resident last July while digging in their garden. The finder reported the discovery to the Portable Antiquities Scheme and the hoard was taken to the British Museum for assessment as potential treasure. As the hoard is more than 300 years old it is covered by the Treasure Act 1996.

0
Have your say

A HOARD of treasure which had been buried in a garden for more than 300 years is now on display in Pontefract Museum.

Wakefield Council has secured £37,000 of national funding towards the cost of the Ackworth Hoard, which was found in a garden in Ackworth last year.

Wakefield Council has expressed a formal interest in acquiring the 'Ackworth Hoard' discovered by an Ackworth resident last July while digging in their garden. '' ''The finder reported the discovery to the Portable Antiquities Scheme and the hoard was taken to the British Museum for assessment as potential treasure. As the hoard is more than 300 years old it is covered by the Treasure Act 1996.'The hoard consists of an inscribed gold finger ring, 48 gold coins and 543 silver coins, all buried in a ceramic pot.

Wakefield Council has expressed a formal interest in acquiring the 'Ackworth Hoard' discovered by an Ackworth resident last July while digging in their garden. '' ''The finder reported the discovery to the Portable Antiquities Scheme and the hoard was taken to the British Museum for assessment as potential treasure. As the hoard is more than 300 years old it is covered by the Treasure Act 1996.'The hoard consists of an inscribed gold finger ring, 48 gold coins and 543 silver coins, all buried in a ceramic pot.

Another £2,000 was raised through public donations.

And it has allowed the council to put a selection of the Hoard, which was found in a pot made in Wrenthorpe, in the museum.

Coun David Dagger, cabinet member for culture, said: “We are delighted to have secured part of The Hoard for display at Pontefract Museum. These items are a real part of this district’s rich history. We need to do all we can to try and keep the treasure in the district for future generations to enjoy.

“Thank you to those who have already donated. We still need more support to secure The Hoard in its entirety so every donation however big or small will help save the items for Yorkshire.”

The Hoard includes 52 gold and 539 silver coins, and a single gold ring inscribed with the words “when this you see, remember me”.

It dates back to the Civil War and was probably buried between 1645 and 1646.

The council got £27,000 from the Victoria and Albert Museum Purchase Grant and £10,000 from the Headley Trust.

And it is hoping to secure another £10,000 for the rest of the Hoard.

Donations can be made at Pontefract Museum, Pontefract Castle, Sandal Castle, Wakefield Tourist Information Centre or any Wakefield district library.

And people can donate by post, to Pontefract Museum, 5 Salter Row, Pontefract, WF8 1BA.

Surplus donations will be used to help pay for conservation of the Hoard.

If not enough is raised to buy the Hoard, donations will be used for the development and care of collections at Pontefract Museum.