Ford reveal they used a robot backside to design seats in the new Fiesta

Ford reveal they used a robot backside to design seats in the new Fiesta
Ford reveal they used a robot backside to design seats in the new Fiesta

Engineers at Ford have revealed they used a robotic bottom in order to design car seats in the new Fiesta.

The robot was designed to move like a human bottom and perfectly simulate how drivers and passengers get in and out of their car seats.

Engineers used pressure maps to establish a “perch pattern”, the data enabling them to test the wear and tear of materials using the robotic bottom – or “Robutt” – to mimic the most common paths.

“From the first moment we get into a car, the seat creates an impression of comfort and quality,” said Svenja Froehlich, a durability engineer, at Ford’s European HQ, in Cologne, Germany.

“Previously, we used pneumatic cylinders that simply moved up and down. With the ‘Robutt’, we are now able to replicate very accurately how people really behave.”

Based on an average-sized large man, the “Robutt” was used to simulate ten years of driving in just three weeks as part of testing for the new Fiesta – sitting down and getting up 25,000 times.

The all-new Ford Fiesta went on sale in the UK in September. The new test will be rolled out for all vehicles in Ford’s European line-up.

Read Matt Allan’s review of the new Fiesta.

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