New school play will be used to stop knife crimes

Sixth form pupils at Airedale Academy have produced a play about knife crime which will be shown to schoolchildren across Yorkshire. Pictured with Paul Hepworth.
Sixth form pupils at Airedale Academy have produced a play about knife crime which will be shown to schoolchildren across Yorkshire. Pictured with Paul Hepworth.

A play produced by sixth form pupils will be shown to students across Yorkshire in an effort to reduce knife crime.

Angel of Knives was created by sixth form pupils at Airedale Academy, and features a series of standalone scenes, each depicting a knife crime incident based on real life events.

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It includes scenarios such as a knife fight, fatal knife injury and the aftermath of violent crimes, and seeks to educate children and teenagers about the danger of carrying a knife.

Tracey Bell, head of Performing Arts, said: “I am a big believer in not doing anything in the classroom that you can’t do for real. The cast, as always, relish the opportunity to give back to their supportive community.

“Knife crime is such a prevalent problem at regional and national level, that we immediately wanted to help.”

Angel of Knives was professionally recorded, and will now be shown to pupils across West Yorkshire.

As part of the production, the students were visited by a representative from St Giles Trust, who explained how he had been stabbed 17 times with his own knife.

Alex Webster, one of the students who has helped develop the play, said it had opened pupils’ eyes to the dangers of carrying a knife.

She said: “We performed for some of the younger children and said it’s not there to scare you, but it’s so important that you understand that’s going on and not to be involved with that.

“Even if you’ve got a knife for protection you are going to get hurt one way or another. If you don’t take it with you it won’t be used.”

Chief Superintendent Paul Hepworth of Wakefield District Police said: “We’ve been delighted to support this play which is a great effort by young people who have delivered a very simple message to fellow young people about the need to put knives down.

“It’s fantastic for us to be able to draw on local talent to help keep our communities safer.”