"Dogs die in hot cars" - police warning after dogs left for over an hour in blazing sunshine

Police have issued a warning reminding people that dogs can die when left in hot cars after a pet was found left in a vehicle despite the hot weather.
Police have issued a warning reminding people that dogs can die when left in hot cars after a pet was found left in a vehicle despite the hot weather.

Police have issued a warning reminding people that dogs can die when left in hot cars after a pet was found left in a vehicle despite the hot weather.

The warning comes after Wildlife Crime Officers found a dog in a car which had been left in the direct sunshine for an hour and a half on Monday, May 13.

The window was left an inch open for the dog.

Police managed to locate the owner just before they smashed the car window to rescue the pup.

Thankfully, the dog is fine and safe.

Wildlife Crime Officer, PC CJ Newsome, described the incident on Twitter.

PC Newsome said: "DOGS DIE IN HOT CARS!!!!! window an inch open, car in sunshine 90 mins. Located owner just before the window was about to be smashed!

"Lady - 'I’ve been to a dancing lesson’... Me - 'Oh that’s okay then!' Dog is fine.."

She reiterated her warning on Tuesday, May 13 due to it being a 'certainty' that someone else would leave their dog in the car.

PC Newsome said: "I’ll retweet this from yesterday, as it’s a certainty that someone WILL leave their ‘beloved’ dog to cook in their car, at some point today!!!"

According to the Wildlife & Rural Crime team, there have been a number of cases where dogs have been left in cars.

On Facebook, the team said: "Since our last update there have been 79 incidents involving animals. Officers dealt with a number of incidents where dogs were left in hot vehicles."

The RSPCA has advised that if it is 22 degrees outside, inside the car it can get to 47 degrees within one hour.

Dogs cannot cool themselves down when left in hot vehicles - even with the windows open - because they can only cool themselves down by panting.

If dogs are too hot and are unable to reduce their body temperature by panting, they will develop heatstroke

Heatstroke can be fatal for dogs.

Under the Animal Welfare Act 2006, leaving your dog in a hot car can be considered a criminal offence.