Profile of a sex killer: Leeds shoe fetishist Christopher Farrow stalked victims before brutal murder of Wendy Speakes

Murderer Christopher Farrow could be released from prison in November pending a decision by the Parole Board
Murderer Christopher Farrow could be released from prison in November pending a decision by the Parole Board

Receptionist Wendy Speakes was targeted by Christopher Farrow as she got off a bus and walked home after work.

He tricked his way into the 51-year-old's house on Balne Lane, Wakefield, on March 15 1994.

Blue mules shoes Wendy Speakes was forced to wear during brutal murder

Blue mules shoes Wendy Speakes was forced to wear during brutal murder

Just an hour earlier he had failed to get into the home of a 24-year-old woman it is believed he had been stalking for days.

Farrow made Mrs Speakes take off her slippers and wear a pair of blue mule shoes.

He forced her upstairs to her bedroom, where he gagged her and bound her hands with a pair of black stockings which he had bought that afternoon.

Farrow placed a pair of her black stilletto shoes on a bedside table before carrying out the attack.

Wendy Speakes

Wendy Speakes

At the same time he stabbed Mrs Speakes, a divorcee who lived alone, nine times in the back and shoulders and twice in the neck.

The killer left a pair of black stockings tied in loops beside the bed and part of a candlewick bedspread which he used to gag her.

Farrow then left the house with a pair of her court shoes as a ‘trophy’.

Mrs Speakes was found at the foot of her bed in a pool of blood by two friends who became worried when she did not arrive for work the next morning.

Stockings used by Farrow during murder of Wendy Speakes

Stockings used by Farrow during murder of Wendy Speakes

Farrow, who lived in Cookridge, Leeds, remained at large for six years despite a major police manhunt which involved an appeal on national television.

Police also took DNA swabs from thousands of men locally in a bid to find a forensic breakthrough.

He was finally exposed through advances in fingerprint technology.
Farrow was arrested in connection with the murder after his fingerprints were matched to one found on the handle of Mrs Speakes' front door.

He had been obliged to give his fingerprints after being arrested for drink driving in June, 1996.

Police e-fit issued by West Yorkshire Police shortly after the murder of Wendy Speakes in 1994.

Police e-fit issued by West Yorkshire Police shortly after the murder of Wendy Speakes in 1994.

He was jailed for life in November 2000 and told he must serve a minimum term of 18 years behind bars.

Detectives said at the time that they believed Farrow, then a 39-year-old painter and decorator, would have become a serial rapist or killer if he had not been caught.

A charge of trying to break into another woman's house in Huddersfield was left on file at his sentencing hearing.

Mrs Speakes' daughter, Tracey Millington-Jones, was outraged after discovering Farrow has now been moved from a secure prison in preparation for release following a Parole Board decision.
She remains convinced he has shown no remorse over her mother's murder and will kill again if granted his freedom.

It is understood Farrow plans to return to West Yorkshire if he is released from prison.

Speaking earlier this year, on the 25th anniversary of her mother's death, Tracey said: "I feel like I am having to take on the Establishment in order to protect every woman in West Yorkshire who will be put at risk if he is allowed back into the community.

"Nobody in authority seems to be listening.

"No one will ever be able to convince me that he is nothing but a danger to women after what he did to my mum.

"I will fight with everything I have got to stop this man from ever being released because he will do it again."

The detective responsible for finally bringing Christopher Farrow to justice also said he believes the killer will pose a ‘significant risk’ to women if he is released from jail.
Retired Detective Chief Superintendent Paul Johnston said he has concerns over the Parole Board decision to pave the way for Farrow’s return into the community.

He said: “There has been no explanation. No apology. No remorse.”