Giant new warehouse on Newmarket Lane in Stanley, which developers claim will create 1,500 jobs, given planning permission

A huge new warehouse to be built on former greenbelt land on Wakefield's northern edge has been given planning permission.

Friday, 16th April 2021, 11:04 am
An artist's impression of how the warehouse will look.

The two million square foot facility will be put up off Newmarket Lane in Stanley and will be occupied by a currently anonymous logistics firm, councillors were told on Thursday.

It will be around half of the size of the 42 metre high Newcold warehouse nearby, which was built in 2018 and has been criticised for being an eyesore on the local landscape.

In a report on the proposals, which it's claimed will create 1,500 jobs, Wakefield Council's planning officers acknowledged that the warehouse would "dominate certain local views".

A birdseye view of the site an anonymous logistics operator will occupy.

But at Thursday's planning meeting, it was suggested that it would be a less "striking and influential" structure than the Newcold facility.

Speaking on behalf of the developers, planning agent Steve Harley told the meeting that the proposals would deliver a "range of local benefits".

He said: "There will be no unacceptable impact on amenity for local residents.

"If planning permission is given, the intention will be for work to start on site immediately, with the occupier requiring it to move into in September next year.

Planning officers say the new structure will be around half the size of the Newcold building.

"We hope and trust this application will be welcomed as a positive boost to the local economy."

Although 49 objections were lodged against the application, no-one spoke against the proposals at the meeting.

The warehouse will be built on land which was allocated for employment when planning permission was given for a new community stadium on Newmarket Lane in 2012.

That development, which would have seen Wakefield Trinity relocate from Belle Vue to the stadium, never came to fruition however.

Although concerns were also raised about the prospect of biodiversity loss at the site, council officers said the developers were contributing more than £250,000 in compensation measures.

Councillors voted by seven to two in favour of the application, with one abstention.

Local Democracy Reporting Service