John Godber visits Minsthorpe Community College for 50th anniversary celebrations

Ray Henshaw, John Godber and Barry Willcock at Minsthorpe Community College's 50th celebration.
Ray Henshaw, John Godber and Barry Willcock at Minsthorpe Community College's 50th celebration.

Minsthorpe Community College has celebrated its 50th Anniversary with a visit from former teacher and acclaimed playwright John Godber.

The school marked their golden anniversary with a celebratory event on Wednesday evening, where pupils performed scenes from Teechers and Bouncers, two of Godber’s most famous plays.

Wednesdays celebrations were open to former pupils and staff members, as well as alumni and current students, and included entertainment from the schools drama and music students.

Wednesdays celebrations were open to former pupils and staff members, as well as alumni and current students, and included entertainment from the schools drama and music students.

Ray Henshaw, the college’s principal, said: “We’ve produced so many successful young people who are going on to achieve great things in their lives.

“We have people that started here in 1969 when we opened and send their children and grandchildren here too.

“The college has come on so much in the past 50 years, and we’re now in the last stages of building work that’s preparing us for the next 50.”

Wednesday’s celebrations were open to former pupils and staff members, as well as alumni and current students.

The school choir provided entertainment for visitors.

The school choir provided entertainment for visitors.

The school's first head teacher, Barry Willcock, also made an appearance.

A photo gallery offered former students a trip down memory lane, while hospitality and catering pupils offered light refreshments to guests.

Mr Godber, who was born in Upton, is said to be the third most performed playwright in the UK, behind William Shakespeare and Alan Ayckbourn.

The playwright, who previously worked as head of drama at the college, joined former students, unveiled a commemorative plaque to mark the school’s anniversary.

Mr Henshaw said it was a “great honour” to have the playwright return to the college for their 50th anniversary celebrations.

Guy, Ross and Darren, former students at the school, said it was “weird” to think of their former teacher as a famous playwright.

Guy said: “Ro us he’s just a teacher. We knew he did plays but he wasn’t famous like he is now.

"He was quite humble and a good laugh, just a normal teacher.”

A number of celebratory anniversary events will be held at the school to mark the anniversary, including school fetes and performances by pupils.